Online Dental Education Library

Our team of dental specialists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with your teeth and gums. Please use our dental library to learn more about dental problems and treatments available. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.

New Filling, Onlay and Crown Instructions.

Follow instructions for 14 days.

1. Avoid sticky foods Gum, taffy, ect..
2. Avoid hard foodsNuts, bread crust, ect..
3. Avoid extremely cold or hot temperaturesLiquids and Food.
4. Brush and Floss as usual

 

TEMPORARY CEMENT INSTRUCTIONS

1. Clean out any excess cement in the crown.
2. Try in the crown to ensure proper seating.
3. Dry the crown with gauze.
4. Open the cement packet, squeeze out its contents and mix together with the end of the cotton swab.
5. Fill the crown with the cement.
6. Place the crown on the tooth and bite down for 10 minutes.
7. Clean off any excess cement.

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR BLEACHING

1. Brush before and after bleaching.
2. Be consistent when you start bleaching your teeth.  Bleach for 10-14 days in a row.
3. Use bleaching material for only 30 minutes a day.
4. Your teeth are more susceptible to stain during bleaching and for 30 days after. Try to avoid dark foods and drinks (tea, coffee, red wine).
5. Rinse trays out gently to avoid distortion.  Do not place in hot water.
6. Teeth may be sensitive to hot and cold for several weeks.
7. Keep the gel you are using at room temperature.  Store all other tubes in the refrigerator.

If you wince with pain after sipping a hot cup of coffee or chewing a piece of ice, chances are that you suffer from "dentin hypersensitivity," or more commonly, sensitive teeth.

Hot and cold temperature changes cause your teeth to expand and contract. Over time, your teeth can develop microscopic cracks that allow these sensations to seep through to the nerves. Exposed areas of the tooth can cause pain and even affect or change your eating, drinking and breathing habits.

At least 45 million adults in the United States suffer at some time from sensitive teeth.

Sensitive teeth result when the underlying layer of your teeth (the dentin) becomes exposed. This can happen on the chewing surface of the tooth as well as at the gum line. In some cases, sensitive teeth are the result of gum disease, years of unconsciously clenching or grinding your teeth, or improper or too vigorous brushing (if the bristles of your toothbrush are pointing in multiple directions, you're brushing too hard).

Abrasive toothpastes are sometimes the culprit of sensitive teeth. Ingredients found in some whitening toothpastes that lighten and/or remove certain stains from enamel, and sodium pyrophosphate, the key ingredient in tartar-control toothpastes, may increase tooth sensitivity.

In some cases, desensitizing toothpaste, sealants, desensitizing ionization and filling materials including fluoride, and decreasing the intake of acid-containing foods can alleviate some of the pain associated with sensitive teeth.

Sometimes, a sensitive tooth may be confused by a patient for a cavity or abscess that is not yet visible.

In any case, contact your dentist if you notice any change in your teeth's sensitivity to temperature.


Dr Scott C. Province
and Associate
General and Cosmetic Dentistry
425 Madison Avenue, Suite 800

New York, NY 10017
(212) 682-8032